Cha Quan
Written by Committee   
Monday, 09 April 2012 23:10

Wushu is known to have borrowed and evolved from martial arts of different countries. In the article 'Origins of Shaolin Kung Fu' http://www.monashwushu.com/articles/17-articles-category/118-the-origins-of-shaolin-kung-fu.html , we learnt that it originated from an Indian prince who knew Indian Martial Arts. This article gives a brief about Cha Quan (traditional style) and its origins. For performances by the Monash Wushu Club and Taichi For Life, Michael usually does a Cha Quan form. Keep a look out for it!

Cha quan is a traditional Chinese martial art. Its graceful movements conceal a vast array of self-defense techniques and help to promote personal health and fitness. The practice of Cha quan is physically demanding, and practitioners can expect an increase in strength, flexibility, stamina, coordination and balance as a result of regular practice. Cha quan is a very broad fighting style, with techniques that cover many different empty hand and weapon methods.

Like many other Chinese martial arts, Cha quan is trained using a combination of forms, individual exercises and sparring. Though the systematic training practitioners will find themselves better suited to particular forms and comprehensive knowledge of every form is not a necessity. Individual exercises are more targeted to the specific needs of the practitioner, and help him or her to round out her abilities by improving strength, fluidity of movement, ability to generate force, balance, control, etc. Shi Lu Tan Tui, or 10 route Spring Legs is a well-known exercise that is an integral part of a Cha quan education. Practice of Tan Tui helps to develop strong kicking ability and solid foot work.

As a form of exercise, the benefits of practicing Cha quan are myriad. New learners will notice improvements in almost all aspects of fitness, and practice of a martial art is a useful tool for improving self-confidence.

Historically, Cha quan has always been associated with the Hui people, an Islamic ethnic minority that live in China. Prior to the 20th century it was very rare for non-Muslims to learn this style. Chang quan, a style of modern wushu practiced throughout China, borrows heavily from Cha quan.

There are two legends about the origins of Cha quan:

One story begins with Sha Liang, a man alive during the Yong Zheng and Qian Long period during the Qing dynasty. He was the chief representative of Muslim soldiers in the Imperial army and is regarded as either the creator of the Cha quan system, or the most important promoter of Cha quan in its early stages. Cha quan spread to other parts of China from Guan Xian county, Shandong province. The primary practitioners of Cha quan were Muslim. Cha quan, and its afilliated art, Tan Tui, was regarded as a Muslim art. Throughout every generation, there were always renowned practitioners of these arts. The early promotion of Cha quan was in Shandong, Hebei, Henan and Anhui provinces, and it was often combined with wrestling.

Another legend states that Cha quan originated in the early stages of the Ming dynasty, and was created by a Muslim called Cha Shangyi. Cha quan in Henan provence was very popular in the Jia Qing period of the Qing dynasty. The main teacher was Ding Jilin, who was a disciple of Shi Taichun from Cangzhou, Hebei province. Ding taught in a number of big mosques in Henan province. His chief disciple, Guo Dengxuan, had close to one hundred disciples due to the popularity of Cha quan. Among them were 3 brothers: Ma Zhongqing, Ma Zhongqi and Ma Zhongli. These three were his most outstanding students. People called them Da Laoshi, Er Laoshi and San Laoshi respectively. All 3 teachers eventually moved on to teach in Anhui province.Cha quan is a traditional Chinese martial art. Its graceful movements conceal a vast array of self-defense techniques and help to promote personal health and fitness. The practice of Cha quan is physically demanding, and practitioners can expect an increase in strength, flexibility, stamina, coordination and balance as a result of regular practice. Cha quan is a very broad fighting style, with techniques that cover many different empty hand and weapon methods.

Source of article:

http://wushu4health.com/articles/

 

Here is a video of a guy doing Cha Quan: